Tuesday, June 27, 2017

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Review by Diak

A perceptive review of King Arthur: Legend of the Sword by academic film scholar Nicholas Diak at Fanbase Press. It can be accessed at http://www.fanbasepress.com/index.php/press/reviews/item/7738-king-arthur-legend-of-the-sword-film-review.

CFP Arthurian Session at NeMLA 2018

Arthurian Legend in the 20th & 21st Centuries

Arthurian Legend in the 20th & 21st Centuries

deadline for submissions: 
September 29, 2017
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 
Imagining Arthurian Legend in the 20th and 21st Centuries
Nostalgia for an imagined and glorious past has influenced the evolution of stories about King Arthur and his court for centuries.  According to the moods and needs of the period, new characters were added to demonstrate or question the excellence of these paragons, or to replace those who had perhaps become too human or simply gone out of style.  New plot motifs, such as the search for the grail and Lancelot’s love for Guinevere became part of the legend.
The past hundred years has brought the legend of King Arthur to Broadway, television, comedy, and Disney; countless authors have appropriated or reimagined the legend and elements from it. How have films, television shows, games, comics, and books for all audiences and ages employed Arthurian characters, themes, motifs, and plots? How have these changes reflected shifting cultural attitudes and values?  What do recent retellings and appropriations of Arthurian legend tell us about ourselves and the generations immediately preceding us?  What do we want and need from King Arthur and his court?
 Please submit abstracts via the NeMLA website http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html
https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2017/05/27/arthurian-legend-in-the-20th-21st-centuries

Arthurian Legend in the 20th & 21st Centuries

deadline for submissions: 
September 29, 2017
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 
Imagining Arthurian Legend in the 20th and 21st Centuries
Nostalgia for an imagined and glorious past has influenced the evolution of stories about King Arthur and his court for centuries.  According to the moods and needs of the period, new characters were added to demonstrate or question the excellence of these paragons, or to replace those who had perhaps become too human or simply gone out of style.  New plot motifs, such as the search for the grail and Lancelot’s love for Guinevere became part of the legend.
The past hundred years has brought the legend of King Arthur to Broadway, television, comedy, and Disney; countless authors have appropriated or reimagined the legend and elements from it. How have films, television shows, games, comics, and books for all audiences and ages employed Arthurian characters, themes, motifs, and plots? How have these changes reflected shifting cultural attitudes and values?  What do recent retellings and appropriations of Arthurian legend tell us about ourselves and the generations immediately preceding us?  What do we want and need from King Arthur and his court?
 Please submit abstracts via the NeMLA website http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html
deadline for submissions: September 29, 2017
full name / name of organization: Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: saustin@landmark.edu

Imagining Arthurian Legend in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Nostalgia for an imagined and glorious past has influenced the evolution of stories about King Arthur and his court for centuries.  According to the moods and needs of the period, new characters were added to demonstrate or question the excellence of these paragons, or to replace those who had perhaps become too human or simply gone out of style.  New plot motifs, such as the search for the grail and Lancelot’s love for Guinevere became part of the legend.

The past hundred years has brought the legend of King Arthur to Broadway, television, comedy, and Disney; countless authors have appropriated or reimagined the legend and elements from it. How have films, television shows, games, comics, and books for all audiences and ages employed Arthurian characters, themes, motifs, and plots? How have these changes reflected shifting cultural attitudes and values?  What do recent retellings and appropriations of Arthurian legend tell us about ourselves and the generations immediately preceding us?  What do we want and need from King Arthur and his court?

 Please submit abstracts via the NeMLA website http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html



Last updated May 30, 2017

Sunday, June 25, 2017

On the Watch: Hellboy vs the Blood Queen

Mike Mignola, creator of the Hellboy series, has recently announced the reboot of the Hellboy film franchise with the upcoming film Hellboy: Rise of the Blood Queen due out in 2018.


There has not been any information released with regards to the plot, but one character in the Hellboy comic referred to as the "Queen of Blood" was a version of Nimue from the Arthurian legends (details at http://hellboy.wikia.com/wiki/Queen_of_Blood). She was featured in a three-series arc that linked Hellboy intimately to the Matter of Britain (see Nathan Harmon's overview at http://sequart.org/magazine/18659/the-sword-in-the-stone-hand-the-arthurian-trends-in-hellboy/). Perhaps this is the story that will unfold in the film.


Bibliography Building: Transformers: The Last Knight

Again, here are the discussions I've come across so far related to Transformers: The Last Knight:



DISCUSSIONS:

Breznican, Anthony. “Transformers: The Last Knight.” Entertainment Weekly 28 April/5 May 2017: 52-53.

“Coming Soon.” Total Film July 2017: 49. 

Farley, Jordan. “Top of the Bots.” Total Film July 2017: 11-13. 

Grove, David. “Hidden History.” SCI FI Magazine August 2017: 56-59.

Bibliography Building: King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

Here are some articles I've come across about King Arthur: Legend of the Sword:



DISCUSSIONS:

Caranicas, Peter. “From Westeros to Realm of King Arthur's Britain.” Variety 19 Aug. 2014: 123. [Int. with Gemma Jackson, production designer]

Chandler, Abigail. “Warrior King.” SciFiNow No. 132 (2017): 56-59.

Crowther, Jane. “Rookie to King.” Total Film June 2017: 70-75.

McNary, Dave. “Arthur on WB Table.” Variety 10 Mar. 2010: 10.

Sullivan, Kevin P. “The Good Knight.” Entertainment Weekly 19 May 2017: 22. [Profile of actor Djimon Hounsou]

- - -. “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword.” Entertainment Weekly 22 July 2016: 50-51.

- - -. “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword.” Entertainment Weekly 28 Apr / 5 May 2017: 40.

- - -. “A New King Will Rise.” Entertainment Weekly 27 Jan. 2017: 34-37.

- - -. “The Sword and the Stone-Cold Fox.” Entertainment Weekly 31 July 2015: 20-27.

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Can Michael Bay Save Camelot?

Even on the eve of its release, there are still very few details on the plot of Transformers: The Last Knight (perhaps a good thing in light of the reception of Guy Ritchie's King Arthur: Legend of the Sword that bowed last month), and there seem to be no paratextual apparatus besides the toys.

More details to follow as/if they become available.

Sunday, June 18, 2017

Kalamazoo 2018 Update

The Alliance proposed the following roundtable for the 2018 International Congress on Medieval Studies. I have just learned today that our proposal was rejected.

Michael A.Torregrossa
Founder




Does the Matter of Britain (Still) Matter?:
Reflections on the State of Arthurian Studies Today (A Roundtable)
            The Arthurian legend is now over a millennium and a half old and continues to inspire new creative works each year. However, texts with widespread distribution and/or lasting impact are rare. Consequently, the Matter of Britain now seems very distant from our daily lives.
            The purpose of this session is to explore the reasons for this separation of the stories of Arthur from the popular consciousness. In conceiving this session, we are interested in exploring the answers to several questions. First, why has the Matter of Britain—once an important part of what J. R. R. Tolkien has termed “the cauldron of story”—now become something that is sampled by few artists with the means to promote their work to the larger segment of the global population that once devoured such stories with enthusiasm? Continuing with this idea, do these works, when noticed, not receive acclaim simply because of their creators’ failure to overcome what Norris J. Lacy has termed the “tyranny of tradition” and produce something that is both recognizable and innovative, or has the legend truly become a niche brand, a fascination to a few cognoscenti but something totally off the radar of most individuals? Similarly, when versions of the legend are produced by individuals with the means to create something that transcends the financial and distributive restrictions that hold back other works (and that might thus have the potential to shape how the current generation perceives the Arthurian story), why do they so often not succeed? Have these creators also simply failed to negotiate the tyranny of tradition, or are audiences at large just not interested in Arthur and all that he represents anymore? Lastly, if the legend no longer appeals, what is the future of Arthurian Studies (and Arthurian scholars) in the remainder of the twenty-first century? Should we entrench ourselves and hope for the best, or can we fight for our field and the glory that was Camelot?

The Alliance for the Promotion of Research on the Matter of Britain is dedicated to study and debate of the representations of the Arthurian legends in all their forms as produced from the Middle Ages through tomorrow. In various incarnations, our organization has been in existence since 2000.

Monday, May 15, 2017

MAPACA Session 2017 CFP

Call for Papers
New Visits to Camelot: Reflecting on the Contemporary Matter of Britain on Screen (Roundtable)
Proposals no later than 29 June 2017

Session sponsored by the Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture
For inclusion under the  Medieval & Renaissance Area at the 28th Annual Conference of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 8-11 November 2017

Following the success of previous sessions at past meetings of the Popular Culture Association, past and present International Congresses on Medieval Studies, and last year’s meeting of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association, the Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture seeks proposals for a sponsored roundtable session on the topic of New Visits to Camelot: Reflecting on the Contemporary Matter of Britain on Screen for inclusion under the Medieval & Renaissance Area at the 28th Annual Conference of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association to be held at the Pennsylvania Sonesta Philadelphia Downtown in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from 8-11 November 2017.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Arthurian enthusiasts are great catalogers of the tradition, and scholars of the legend on screen have been especially devoted to their task, as attested by the filmographic work of Kevin J. Harty, Bert Olton, Michael N. Salda, and Michael A. Torregrossa and the wider-ranging catalogs by the bibliographing teams of Ann F. Howey and Stephen R. Reimer and of Daniel P. Nastali and Philip C. Boardman. However, the energies of these individuals remains largely limited to the last century, and, in the past seventeen years, the Matter of Britain has grown enormously on screen. The corpus has nearly doubled as the mediums of film, television, electronic games, and the Internet have presented fresh adventures of the familiar cast of characters from Camelot as well as granted Arthurian-themed escapades to new figures. Despite their popularity, this new Matter of Britain on Screen remains underexplored. Consequently, the purpose of this session is to investigate these recent representations of the legend and address their attempts at navigating what Norris J. Lacy has termed “the tyranny of tradition,” that “particular kind of filmic ‘anxiety of influence,’ whereby filmmakers must deal with two opposing impulses: on the one hand, the natural desire to innovate; on the other, the need to tell a story that corresponds at least in major respects to the audience’s understanding of orthodox Arthurian fact” (76). Succeed or fail in their efforts, these new Arthurian texts remain important artifacts in assessing the continued vitality of the millennium-and-half-old myth of Arthur and his world.
An ever-expanding list of potential works can be found at our website: https://MatterofBritainonScreen.blogspot.com/.

Please send abstracts of approximately 300 words, any audio-visual requests, and a brief biography narrative related to your scholarly career to the organizer, Michael A. Torregrossa, at MedievalStudiesonScreen@gmail.com, using “New Visits to Camelot” as your subject line.

All presenters must be or become members of Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association in order to participate. Upon acceptance of proposals, presenters must register with MAPACA and submit their information into their online system no later than 30 June 2017. Complete details will follow from the organizer.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

In Memory of Don Rickles

Comedian Don Rickles passed away recently. Arthurian enthusiasts might remember his portrayal of Cornwall, one half of a two-headed dragon, in the animated film Quest for Camelot (1998). The character is introduced (along with his other half, Devon) in the following musical number.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Kalamazoo 2018 Session

The Alliance is interested in sponsoring a round table on the upcoming King Arthur: The Legend of the Sword film (the first of a sex-film series, we are told) for next Kalamazoo (i.e. 2018).

Please contact us at kingarthurforever2000@gmail.com should you be interested in participating.


Saturday, April 8, 2017

New article on Ritchie's King Arthur

Sci Fi magazine, a publication of the Syfy channel, has released a 3-page piece on the upcoming King Arthur film in its June 2017 issue. The number is available at newsstands and bookstores; you can also receive the magazine by subscription. 

Monday, February 20, 2017

Synopsis for "Camelot/3000"

The Futon Critic website has posted the following plot synopsis for this week's upcoming episode of Legends of Tomorrow:

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21

DC'S LEGENDS OF TOMORROW

"Camelot/3000" - (9:00-10:00 p.m. ET) (TV-14, LV) (HDTV)

ALL FOR ONE - The Legends continue their quest to hunt down the Spear of Destiny before the pieces fall into the hands of the Legion of Doom. The Legends discover that pieces of the Spear are each being guarded in different time periods by members of the JSA. Their first stop is the future where they find Dr. Mid-Nite (guest star Kwesi Ameyaw) which eventually leads them to the past and King Arthur's Camelot, where Stargirl (guest star Sarah Grey) is protecting her piece of the Spear. In order to protect the Spear shard from the now-evil Rip Hunter (Arthur Darvill), the Legends must join forces with the Knights of the Round Table. Caity Lotz, Franz Drameh, Victor Garber, Brandon Routh, Dominic Purcell, Nick Zano and Maisie Richardson-Sellers also star. Antonio Negret directed the episode written by Anderson MacKenzie (#212). Original airdate 2/21/2017.

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Transformers: The Last Knight Super Bowl Extended Teaser

Here's the most recent trailer on Transformers: The Last Knight. Nothing specifically Arthurian or medieval here.


Transformers: The Last Knight Teaser

I found the first teaser for Transformers: The Last Knight. This was released last December. The "Arthurian" section appears near the beginning.


More on Transformers: The Last Knight

Another video from Nerdist News on Transformers: The Last Knight, but nothing specific on the Arthurian link.


Transformers: The Last Knight Speculation

I need to track down the trailer to Transformers: The Last Knight, but for now the following overview from Nerdist.com offers some possible plot points, including speculation about Merlin, Excalibur, and Arthur.


Camelot/3000 Trailer

CW released a trailer last week for the upcoming Legends of Tomorrow episode "Camelot/3000". The episode airs next Tuesday, 2/21.


The ComicBookMovie.com website offers set of stills from the episode and plot details at https://www.comicbookmovie.com/tv/dc/legends_of_tomorrow/the-legends-join-the-round-table-in-stills-from-legends-a148810.

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Legends of Tomorrow Update

It was announced late last year that an upcoming episode of the CW series Legends of Tomorrow would be titled "Camelot/3000." Immediate speculation online (see for example https://www.bleedingcool.com/2016/12/01/legends-tomorrow-bringing-camelot-3000/)  suggested a connection to the comic book series Camelot 3000 (details on the series at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camelot_3000), but series co-creator/executive producer Marc Guggenheim has finally pronounced on the episode's content in a recent interview for IGN (http://www.ign.com/articles/2017/01/31/legends-of-tomorrow-captain-cold-is-still-joining-the-legion-of-doom), where he explains:
Yeah, that's a great episode. Actually Phil [Klemmer] and I were just on the editing room for that yesterday. I think the show does a great job with the production value and creating different time periods and Camelot sets a new bar. I will say, just managing expectations, we are not doing our adaptation of Camelot 3000 by Mike W. Barr. That slash in the title, Camelot/3000 is very much there for a reason. I'll just say it takes place in two time periods - the year 3000, and it takes place in Camelot. I was like, if we have an episode where we happen to be in Camelot and we happen to be in the year 3000 and we don't call it some variation of Camelot 3000, we're doing something wrong. That's sort of all I'll say.
Further details to follow as they become available. The episode is set to air on 21 February 2017.


Friday, January 6, 2017

Medieval in American Popular Culture sessions

Our affiliate, Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture is sponsoring a session on "The Medieval in American Popular Culture: Reflections in Commemoration of the 80th Anniversary of Prince Valiant." Complete details can be found at our main site at http://medievalinpopularculture.blogspot.com/2017/01/call-for-papers-medieval-in-american.html.

Thursday, June 30, 2016

Kalamazoo 2017 News

Please check out our sibling blog, Medieval Studies on Screen, for details on our call for papers for next year's International Congress on Medieval Studies. The session is devoted to animated representations of the medieval and is offered in memory of the late Michael N. Salda, author of Arthurian Animation: A Study of Cartoon Camelots on Film and Television.

Details at http://medievalstudiesonscreen.blogspot.com/2016/06/cfp-animating-medieval-proposals-by.html.